Landscape-level vegetation recovery from herbivory: progress after four decades of invasive red deer control

Report long-term vegetation changes in permanent plots located in forest, shrubland and grassland communities across a mountain range in southern New Zealand. We test whether 92% reduction in the population of invasive non-indigenous red deer, Cervus elaphus, since 1964 has led to the recovery of deer-preferred species.

Tanentzap, A.J.; Burrows, L.E.; Lee, W.G.; Nugent, G; Maxwell, J.M.; Coomes, D.A.
2009
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Mapping community change in modified landscapes

We convert point observations of more than 28,000 beetles from 851 species into a continuous biodiversity surface representing the similarity of ecological communities relative to that of pristine forest, effectively integrating on-the-ground biodiversity data with remotely sensed landcover data to predict the magnitude of community change in a modified landscape.

Ewers, R.M.; Kapos, V.; Coomes, D.A.; Lafortezza, R.; Didham, R.K.
2009
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Size-dependence of growth and mortality influence the shade tolerance of trees in a lowland temperate rain forest

Quantification of growth and mortality for two different juvenile life stages – seedlings and saplings– of seven tree species common in temperate rain forests in New Zealand using data from field studies. Strong evidence that the ranking of species for survival in shade and growth in full light was affected by size.

Kunstler, G.; Coomes, D.A.; Canham, C.D.
2009
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Testing the Metabolic Scaling Theory of tree growth

Metabolic Scaling Theory (MST) predicts a ‘universal scaling law’ of tree growth. Proponents claim that MST has strong empirical support: the size-dependent growth curves of 40 out of 45 species in a Costa Rican forest have scaling exponents indistinguishable from the MST prediction. This paper shows the Costa Rican data has been misinterpreted. Using Standardized MajorAxis (SMA) line-fitting to estimate scaling exponents, we find that four out of five species represented have scaling exponents that deviate significantly from the prediction.

Coomes, D.A.; Allen, R.B.
2009
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A greater range of shade-tolerance niches in nutrient-rich forests: an explanation for positive richness–productivity relationships?

Investigating if a wider range of growth rates and shade tolerances are found on nutrient-rich soils, because such soils not only support fast-growing species with high metabolic rates, but also species capable of tolerating the very deep shade cast by forest canopies growing where nutrients are plentiful.

Coomes, D.A.; Kunstler, G.; Canham, C.D.; Wright, E.
2009
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The benefits of being in a bad neighbourhood: plant community composition influences red deer foraging decisions

The role of neighbour palatability in affecting foraging of a target plant by large mammalian herbivores using a large-scale field dataset on diet selection by red deer. Examining whether intraspecific variation in browsing of plants can be related to variation in the local abundance of alternative forage species.

Bee, J.N.; Tanentzap, A.J.; Lee, W.G.; Lavers, R.B.; Mark, A.F.; Mills, J.A.; Coomes, D.A.
2009
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Spatially explicit models to analyze forest loss and fragmentation between 1976 and 2020 in southern Chile

Identification of the geophysical variables (“pattern drivers”) that explain the spatial patterns of forest loss and fragmentation between 1976 and 1999 using both a GIS-based land-use change model (GEOMOD) and spatially explicit logistic regression. Includes projections where and how much forest fragmentation will occur in the future by extrapolation of the current rate of deforestation to 2010 and 2020.

Echeverria, C.; Coomes, D.A.; Hall, M.; Newton, A.C.
2008
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NEOENDEMISM IN MADAGASCAN SCALY TREE FERNS RESULTS FROM RECENT, COINCIDENT DIVERSIFICATION BURSTS

The evolution of Madagascan tree ferns as a rainforest-specific model family, integrating results from bioclimatic niche analysis with a dated phylogenetic framework, and proposal of an evolutionary scenario of large island endemic clades. Showing that Madagascar’s extant tree fern diversity springs from three distinct ancestors independently colonising Madagascar during the Miocene.

Janssen, J.; Bystriakova, N.; Rakotondrainibe, F.; Coomes, D.; Labat, J.; Schneider H.
2008
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Scaling of xylem vessels and veins within oak leaves

An examination of the scaling of the leaf xylem in ten temperate oak species to test general models of plant vascular architecture, based on scaling of pipe diameters in order to minimize hydraulic resistance within the xylem, which have neglected to consider the variations in leaf hydraulic properties.

Coomes, D.A.; Heathcote, S.; Godfrey, E.R.; Shepherd, J.J.; Sack, L.
2008
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Effects of size, competition and altitude on tree growth

An exploration of the factors regulating the diameter growth of 3334 trees of mountain beech growing in natural single-species forests in New Zealand. Maximum-likelihood modelling was used to quantify the influences of tree size, altitude, the basal area of taller neighbours (BL) and the basal area of all neighbours (BT) on growth.

Coomes, D.A.; Allen, R.B.
2007
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Resistance and resilience of New Zealand tree species to browsing

A prominent idea in the literature on plant–herbivore interactions is that fast-growing
species have low resistance but high resilience to herbivory. Fast-growing species are selectively eaten by herbivores but recover quickly following damage. This is an analysis whether this resistance-resilience trade-off applies to New Zealand woody species, which evolved without exposure to mammalian herbivores.

BEE, J.N.; KUNSTLER, G.; COOMES, D.A.
2007
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Scaling of tree vascular transport systems along gradients of nutrient supply and altitude

Investigating whether trees growing at high altitude or on nutrient-depleted soils prioritise survival over minimising hydraulic resistance by narrowing xylem distally or of their vascular systems would be structured differently from those of trees growing under more benign conditions. Conduits were observed to narrow towards the periphery of vascular system within all members of all species investigated, and scaling relation-ships were indistinguishable across a range of environments.

Coomes, D.A.; Jenkins, K.L.; Cole L.E.S.
2006
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Rapid deforestation and fragmentation of Chilean Temperate Forests

Three land-cover maps were derived from satellite imagery acquired over 25 years (1975, 1990 and 2000), and were used to assess the patterns of deforestation and forest fragmentation in the coastal range of south-central Chile. Between 1975 and 2000, there was a reduction in natural forest area of 67% in the study area, which is equivalent to an annual forest loss rate of 4.5% per year using a compound-interest-rate formula.

Echeverria, C.; Coomes, D.A. et al.
2006
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Long-Term Effects of Wild fire on Ecosystem Properties Across an Island Area Gradient

Boreal forest soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle by functioning as a large terrestrial carbon sink or source, and the alteration of fire regime through global change phenomena may influence this role. In this study a system of forested lake islands in the boreal zone of Sweden for which fire frequency increases with increasing island size was investigated for evidence of environmental factors being influenced by fire frequency.

Wardle, D.A.; Hörnberg, G.; Zackrisson, O.; Kalela-Brundin, M.; Coomes, D.A.
2003
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Seed mass and the competition /colonization trade-off: competitive interactions and spatial patterns in a guild of annual plants

Using neighbourhood modelling to estimate individual-level competition coefficients for seven annuals growing in limestone grassland over 2 years the relative strength of intra- and interspecific competition was calculated and related to differences in seed size and plant size between targets and neighbours.

TURNBULL, L.A; COOMES, D.A.; HECTOR, A.; REES, M.
2004
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IMPACTS OF ROOT COMPETITION IN FORESTS AND WOODLANDS: A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTS

Predicting the types of forest in which root competition affects seedling performance, and the types of plants that respond most strongly to release from root competition. Testing predictions by reviewing experiments in which tree seedlings and forest herbs are released from belowground competition, usually by cutting trenches to sever the roots of surrounding trees.

Coomes, D.A.; Grubb, P.J.

2000

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Disturbances prevent stem size-density distributions in natural forests from following scaling relationships

Enquist and Niklas propose that trees in natural forests have invariant size-density distributions (SDDs) that scale as a -2 power of stem diameter, although early studies described such distributions using negative exponential functions. Using New Zealand and ‘global’ data sets, we demonstrate that neither type of function accurately describes the SDD over the entire diameter range.
Coomes, D.A.; Duncan, R.P.; Allen, R.B.; Truscott, J.
2003

Comment on “A Brief History of Seed Size”

A comment on ‘A Brief History of Seed Size’ by Mole et al. in which an argument is made against understanding the association of greater seed size with greater plant height through use of Charnov’s life-history theory for mammals.

Grubb, P.J.; Coomes, D.A.; Metcalfe, D.J.

2005

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