Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size

A global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon. At the extreme the annual fixing of carbon by a single large tree can equal the entire carbon content of a smaller tree.

Stephenson, N.L. et al.
2014
PDF

Quantifying variation in forest disturbance, and its effects on aboveground biomass dynamics, across the eastern United States

We analyzed forest inventory data from the eastern United States to estimate plot-level variation in mortality (relative to a long-term background rate for individual trees) for nine distinct forest regions. Disturbances that produced at least a fourfold increase in tree mortality over an approximately 5 year interval were observed in 1–5% of plots in each forest region.

VANDERWEL, M.C.; COOMES, D.A.; PURVES, D.W.
2013
PDF

Competitive interactions between forest trees are driven by species’ trait hierarchy, not phylogenetic or functional similarity: implications for forest community assembly

Using growth data, we estimated 275 interaction coefficients between tree species in the French mountains. We show that interaction strengths are mainly driven by trait hierarchy and not by functional or phylogenetic similarity.

Kunstler, G.; Lavergne, S.; Courbaud, B.; Thuiller, W.; Vieilledent, G.; Zimmermann, N.E.; Kattge, J.; Coomes D.A.
2012
PDF

Size-Specific Tree Mortality Varies with Neighbourhood Crowding and Disturbance in a Montane Nothofagus Forest

Using permanent plot data from Nothofagus forest, New Zealand, where the fates of trees were followed, to examine patterns of size-specific mortality over three consecutive periods spanning 30 years, each characterised by different disturbance, and the strength and direction of neighbourhood crowding effects on size-specific mortality rates.

Hurst, J.M.; Allen, R.B.; Coomes, D.A.; Duncan, R.P.
2011
PDF

Species- and community-level patterns in fine root traits along a 120 000-year soil chronosequence in temperate rain forest

Measurement of species- and community-level root and leaf trait responses for 50 temperate rainforest species from 28 families of ferns, woody and herbaceous angiosperms and conifers, along a soil chronosequence in New Zealand that exhibits a strong gradient in soil nutrient availability.

Holdaway, R.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Dickie, I.A.; Peltzer D.A.; Coomes, D.A.
2011
PDF

Do leaves of plants on phosphorus-impoverished soils contain high concentrations of phenolic defence compounds?

Comparing the foliar concentrations of phenolic compounds in phenotypes of 21 species growing on P-rich alluvial terraces and P-depleted marine terraces in southern New Zealand, and 87 species growing under similar climates on comparatively P-rich soils in New Zealand vs. P-depleted soils in Tasmania.

Wright, D.M.; Jordan, G.J.; Lee, W.G.; Duncan, R.P.; Forsyth, D.M.; Coomes, D.A.
2010
PDF

Interspecific relationships among growth, mortality and xylem traits of woody species from New Zealand

Testing the hypotheses that there is a set of inter-related trade-offs linked to the different functions of wood, that these trade-offs have direct consequences for tree growth and survival and that these trade-offs underlie the observed correlations between wood density and demographic rates.

Russo, S.E.; Jenkins, K.L.; Wiser, S.K.; Uriarte, M.; Duncan, R.P.; Coomes, D.A.
2010
PDF

Mapping community change in modified landscapes

We convert point observations of more than 28,000 beetles from 851 species into a continuous biodiversity surface representing the similarity of ecological communities relative to that of pristine forest, effectively integrating on-the-ground biodiversity data with remotely sensed landcover data to predict the magnitude of community change in a modified landscape.

Ewers, R.M.; Kapos, V.; Coomes, D.A.; Lafortezza, R.; Didham, R.K.
2009
PDF

Size-dependence of growth and mortality influence the shade tolerance of trees in a lowland temperate rain forest

Quantification of growth and mortality for two different juvenile life stages – seedlings and saplings– of seven tree species common in temperate rain forests in New Zealand using data from field studies. Strong evidence that the ranking of species for survival in shade and growth in full light was affected by size.

Kunstler, G.; Coomes, D.A.; Canham, C.D.
2009
PDF

A greater range of shade-tolerance niches in nutrient-rich forests: an explanation for positive richness–productivity relationships?

Investigating if a wider range of growth rates and shade tolerances are found on nutrient-rich soils, because such soils not only support fast-growing species with high metabolic rates, but also species capable of tolerating the very deep shade cast by forest canopies growing where nutrients are plentiful.

Coomes, D.A.; Kunstler, G.; Canham, C.D.; Wright, E.
2009
PDF

The benefits of being in a bad neighbourhood: plant community composition influences red deer foraging decisions

The role of neighbour palatability in affecting foraging of a target plant by large mammalian herbivores using a large-scale field dataset on diet selection by red deer. Examining whether intraspecific variation in browsing of plants can be related to variation in the local abundance of alternative forage species.

Bee, J.N.; Tanentzap, A.J.; Lee, W.G.; Lavers, R.B.; Mark, A.F.; Mills, J.A.; Coomes, D.A.
2009
PDF

NEOENDEMISM IN MADAGASCAN SCALY TREE FERNS RESULTS FROM RECENT, COINCIDENT DIVERSIFICATION BURSTS

The evolution of Madagascan tree ferns as a rainforest-specific model family, integrating results from bioclimatic niche analysis with a dated phylogenetic framework, and proposal of an evolutionary scenario of large island endemic clades. Showing that Madagascar’s extant tree fern diversity springs from three distinct ancestors independently colonising Madagascar during the Miocene.

Janssen, J.; Bystriakova, N.; Rakotondrainibe, F.; Coomes, D.; Labat, J.; Schneider H.
2008
PDF

IDENTIFYING AGGREGATION AND ASSOCIATION IN FULLY MAPPED SPATIAL DATA

Describes a clump recognition process that may be used to analyze fully mapped spatial data. Any given spatial pattern can be made less aggregated by replacing the closest-together pair of plants by a single individual at their centroid position. By repeatedly amalgamating pairs of individuals in this way, an initially aggregated pattern can be reduced to one indistinguishable from complete spatial randomness.

Coomes, D.A.; Rees, M.; Turnbull, L.

1999

PDF

Disturbances prevent stem size-density distributions in natural forests from following scaling relationships

Enquist and Niklas propose that trees in natural forests have invariant size-density distributions (SDDs) that scale as a -2 power of stem diameter, although early studies described such distributions using negative exponential functions. Using New Zealand and ‘global’ data sets, we demonstrate that neither type of function accurately describes the SDD over the entire diameter range.
Coomes, D.A.; Duncan, R.P.; Allen, R.B.; Truscott, J.
2003

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑