On the challenges of using field spectroscopy to measure the impact of soil type on leaf traits

Working with 24 chemical and physical leaf traits of six European tree species growing on strongly contrasting soil types (i.e. deep alluvium versus nearby shallow chalk), we asked whether variability in leaf traits is greater between tree species or soil type,
and whether field spectroscopy is effective at predicting intraspecific variation in leaf traits as well as interspecific differences.

Nunes, M.H; Davey, M.P.; Coomes, D.A.
2017
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Competitive interactions between forest trees are driven by species’ trait hierarchy, not phylogenetic or functional similarity: implications for forest community assembly

Using growth data, we estimated 275 interaction coefficients between tree species in the French mountains. We show that interaction strengths are mainly driven by trait hierarchy and not by functional or phylogenetic similarity.

Kunstler, G.; Lavergne, S.; Courbaud, B.; Thuiller, W.; Vieilledent, G.; Zimmermann, N.E.; Kattge, J.; Coomes D.A.
2012
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Size-Specific Tree Mortality Varies with Neighbourhood Crowding and Disturbance in a Montane Nothofagus Forest

Using permanent plot data from Nothofagus forest, New Zealand, where the fates of trees were followed, to examine patterns of size-specific mortality over three consecutive periods spanning 30 years, each characterised by different disturbance, and the strength and direction of neighbourhood crowding effects on size-specific mortality rates.

Hurst, J.M.; Allen, R.B.; Coomes, D.A.; Duncan, R.P.
2011
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Interspecific relationships among growth, mortality and xylem traits of woody species from New Zealand

Testing the hypotheses that there is a set of inter-related trade-offs linked to the different functions of wood, that these trade-offs have direct consequences for tree growth and survival and that these trade-offs underlie the observed correlations between wood density and demographic rates.

Russo, S.E.; Jenkins, K.L.; Wiser, S.K.; Uriarte, M.; Duncan, R.P.; Coomes, D.A.
2010
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Size-dependence of growth and mortality influence the shade tolerance of trees in a lowland temperate rain forest

Quantification of growth and mortality for two different juvenile life stages – seedlings and saplings– of seven tree species common in temperate rain forests in New Zealand using data from field studies. Strong evidence that the ranking of species for survival in shade and growth in full light was affected by size.

Kunstler, G.; Coomes, D.A.; Canham, C.D.
2009
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A greater range of shade-tolerance niches in nutrient-rich forests: an explanation for positive richness–productivity relationships?

Investigating if a wider range of growth rates and shade tolerances are found on nutrient-rich soils, because such soils not only support fast-growing species with high metabolic rates, but also species capable of tolerating the very deep shade cast by forest canopies growing where nutrients are plentiful.

Coomes, D.A.; Kunstler, G.; Canham, C.D.; Wright, E.
2009
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The benefits of being in a bad neighbourhood: plant community composition influences red deer foraging decisions

The role of neighbour palatability in affecting foraging of a target plant by large mammalian herbivores using a large-scale field dataset on diet selection by red deer. Examining whether intraspecific variation in browsing of plants can be related to variation in the local abundance of alternative forage species.

Bee, J.N.; Tanentzap, A.J.; Lee, W.G.; Lavers, R.B.; Mark, A.F.; Mills, J.A.; Coomes, D.A.
2009
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Effects of size, competition and altitude on tree growth

An exploration of the factors regulating the diameter growth of 3334 trees of mountain beech growing in natural single-species forests in New Zealand. Maximum-likelihood modelling was used to quantify the influences of tree size, altitude, the basal area of taller neighbours (BL) and the basal area of all neighbours (BT) on growth.

Coomes, D.A.; Allen, R.B.
2007
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Seed mass and the competition /colonization trade-off: competitive interactions and spatial patterns in a guild of annual plants

Using neighbourhood modelling to estimate individual-level competition coefficients for seven annuals growing in limestone grassland over 2 years the relative strength of intra- and interspecific competition was calculated and related to differences in seed size and plant size between targets and neighbours.

TURNBULL, L.A; COOMES, D.A.; HECTOR, A.; REES, M.
2004
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IMPACTS OF ROOT COMPETITION IN FORESTS AND WOODLANDS: A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTS

Predicting the types of forest in which root competition affects seedling performance, and the types of plants that respond most strongly to release from root competition. Testing predictions by reviewing experiments in which tree seedlings and forest herbs are released from belowground competition, usually by cutting trenches to sever the roots of surrounding trees.

Coomes, D.A.; Grubb, P.J.

2000

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